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The Man Who Lost His Spade

Aesop’s Fables March 5, 2018
Greek
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1 min read
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    A Man was engaged in digging over his vineyard, and one day on coming to work he missed his Spade. Thinking it may have been stolen by one of his labourers, he questioned them closely, but they one and all denied any knowledge of it. He was not convinced by their denials, and insisted that they should all go to the town and take oath in a temple that they were not guilty of the theft. This was because he had no great opinion of the simple country deities, but thought that the thief would not pass undetected by the shrewder gods of the town. When they got inside the gates the first thing they heard was the town crier proclaiming a reward for information about a thief who had stolen something from the city temple. “Well,” said the Man to himself, “it strikes me I had better go back home again. If these town gods can’t detect the thieves who steal from their own temples, it’s scarcely likely they can tell me who stole my Spade.”

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